Page 53 - Chatham-Kent Hospice
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  The loss of a loved one is never easy. Whether death is sudden or expected, there are many questions about what comes next.
When death occurs in a residential hospice, we take the time to help Chatham-Kent Hospice make the moment meaningful.
After a loved one's death, the care provider or funeral home of the family's choosing is notified by the healthcare professionals or by a member of your family. We will ask certain questions such as what room your loved one is in and who is with them. We will provide the caller with a confirmation that we will make our way to the place of death as soon as possible.
As we receive the deceased's body into our care, our actions, words, and gestures are some of the most important moments in our relationship with the survivors.
During this sacred transition of care (historically known as the removal), our actions are always:
RESPECTFUL • UNHURRIED • GENTLE • CARING
Our staff members are always neatly and respectfully attired. We introduce ourselves to the family and assess the readiness of those present for the transition of care to occur.
If family members or friends are present, we ask if they would prefer to leave the room or remain as we transfer their loved one.
We then place a pillow under the deceased person’s head and gently place the body onto a fresh linen sheet before moving to the stretcher. Residential hospice always provides a quilt to place on top of our quilted stretcher.
We then invite the family to walk with us to a place of farewell and reflection within the hospice before making our way to the entrance. Once we reach the front, it is important that we stop and offer those present as much time as they need to say another goodbye. This is not a time to rush. As far as we are concerned, this role is a powerful responsibility.
Before leaving, our staff will take a final moment with the family to ensure all present that we will continue the care the deceased has received from the Chatham-Kent Hospice and then invite any questions there may be at that time. We will also ask if there is a suitable meeting time for our staff to visit with the family to discuss final arrangements. This meeting can happen at our place or yours, wherever is more comfortable. There are certain items we may ask you to prepare for our visit. This could include photos, clothing, glasses or dentures. As we begin to work together to fulfill the final wishes, we invite the family to share with us any items or stories that help remind you of your loved one.
We hope that this explanation of how we conduct the Transition of Care provides you with some understanding and comfort. If you have any questions at all, please do not hesitate to call us, anytime.























































































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