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Pre-Planning
The Advantages of Planning Ahead
 The idea behind planning ahead is simple. One day, a great deal of vital information about you or a loved one will be needed by your family and anyone whose responsibility it is to assist them. Those who plan ahead can be assured that not only will their personal wishes be fulfilled, but other unnecessary difficulties will be avoided.
Both you and your loved ones can benefit when funeral arrangements are made well ahead of need. It can be beneficial to include your immediate family in these plans, ensuring those left behind are aware of your wishes and able to plan a meaningful funeral that will help them begin their mourning. By discussing plans in advance, you can take time to make decisions about cremation or burial, the type of ceremony, and other elements of the funeral.
You may want to discuss your thoughts and decisions not only with your family but also a funeral service professional. This planning guide can be used to capture your wishes and biographical information in advance. Upon completion, simply store it in a safe place with your other important documents.
Most of us plan ahead in life. We plan for our wedding, our children’s education, family vacations, and other significant expected life events. We also plan for the unexpected events of life by purchasing home, auto, and medical insurance.
Understanding the benefits of pre-planning has prompted many to take the step to plan their own arrangements.
Why Pre-Plan?
 Peace of mind
Pre-planning takes the burden of making important decisions off your loved ones during a difficult time.
Financial assurance
Pre-payment of your funeral through our funeral home will render the costs associated with your final expenses inflation-proof.
Longevity
Pre-planning your funeral will make certain that your choices are respected and carried out, without leaving your family to wonder what your wishes may have been.
There are many different ways to begin the planning ahead conversation. You know your family and how your loved ones might best respond to the topic. For some families, it might be a casual conversation over dinner or another family gathering. For other families, a formal meeting might be better suited.
Regardless of your approach, the conversation is much easier to have when death is not imminent. Discussing the subject with loved ones earlier in life when they are younger, and most likely healthier, makes the topic easier to talk about and keeps the focus on the celebration of life rather than an impending loss.
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